1. Tax march: Protesters in Philly call on Trump to release tax returns 

Protesters chanting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, corporate greed has got to go” marched in Center City on Saturday, calling for President Trump to release his tax returns.
With a 10-foot inflatable chicken leading the march – perched on the bed of a gray Chevrolet pickup truck – a crowd estimated by a police inspector at 2,000 peacefully marched down Market Street from City Hall to Independence Mall.
To the sounds of drums beating and tambourines clashing, the protesters chanted along with march leader Devan Spear, 21, a University of Pennsylvania senior and an organizer with the Penn Student Labor Action Project, as she yelled into a microphone, “Donald, show us what you paid!” and “No more secrets, no more lies! Show your taxes, show your ties!”
The Tax March Philly rally was one of about 150 planned nationwide for April 15, which is traditionally Tax Day. (This year, though, Tax Day has been pushed back to April 18 as the deadline for the filing of taxes.)

2. Mass evacuation in Syria to proceed after blast kills 68 kids

 
More than 3,000 Syrians were expected to be evacuated Sunday from four areas as part of a population transfer that was briefly stalled a day earlier by a deadly blast that killed more than 120 people, many of them government supporters.
 
As the evacuations were expected to begin Sunday, shells fired by the Islamic State group on government-held parts of the eastern city of Deir el-Zour wounded two members of a Russian media delegation visiting the area, according to state-run Syrian news agency SANA. 
 
The United Nations is not overseeing the transfer deal, which involves residents of two pro-government villages and two opposition-held towns. All four have been under siege for years, their fate linked through a series of reciprocal agreements that the U.N. says have hindered aid deliveries.
 
Rami Abdurrahman, who heads the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, and Hezbollah’s Al-Manar TV said 3,000 people will be evacuated from the government held villages, while 200, the vast majority of them fighters, will be evacuated from the opposition-held towns.
 

3. Turkey referendum: Erdogan declares victory

 
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the country’s prime minister have declared victory in a Sunday referendum designed to hand Erdogan sweeping powers. 
 
The Turkish Election Commission has yet to release its official results, and the opposition promised to contest at least a third of the votes cast. But according to the state-run Anadolu Agency, with 100% of the ballots counted, Erdogan appeared poised to win with 51.2% of voters casting ballots in his favor. 
A total of 47.5 million votes were cast, Anadolu said.
 
“God willing, these results will be the beginning of a new era in our country,” Erdogan said at a news conference Sundaynight, explaining that unofficial totals indicated the “yes” votes had prevailed in the referendum by about 1.3 million ballots, while Anadolu pegged it at closer to 1.14 million.
 
Shortly before Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım declared a victory for Erdogan, thousands converged in celebration at the Ankara headquarters of the Justice and Development Party, or AKP, that Erdogan founded. The revelers honked their horns and waved Turkish flags along with white flags saying, “Evet” — Turkish for yes — which appeared to be the way the majority of voters cast their ballots.
 

 

4. North Korean missile test fails, US and South Korea say

An attempted missile launch by North Korea on Sunday failed, US and South Korean defense officials told CNN.

The attempted launch occurred a day after the regime of Kim Jong Un showed off a bevy of new missiles and launchers at a large-scale military parade on its most important holiday.

A South Korean defense official said the action took place in Sinpo, a port city in eastern North Korea. That was the site of a ballistic missile test earlier this month in which the projectile fell into the Sea of Japan, also known as the East Sea.

The North Koreans use Sinpo shipyard for their submarine activity, and US satellites have observed increased activity there in April, a US official said at the time of the previous test.
South Korean and US intelligence officials are trying to determine what type of missile was used Sunday, but initial reports said it could be a medium-range missile, according to a White House foreign policy adviser.
 
US Vice President Mike Pence, who is in the area as part of previous scheduled trip, was briefed on the launch, administration officials said.
 

5Cleveland police seek suspect in Facebook homicide video

Cleveland police are seeking a suspect who posted video of an apparent homicide on Facebook, authorities said Sunday.
The suspect claims to have committed multiple homicides, according to Cleveland police, adding that no other victims have yet been found.
 
Police have identified the suspect as Steve Stephens. Stephens, a black male who is 6-1 and weighs 244 pounds, was last seen wearing a dark blue and grey or black striped polo shirt. Stephens was driving a white Ford Fusion with temporary license plates, police said. 
 
Police say he is armed and dangerous. The FBI is assisting Cleveland police in the manhunt.
 
Stephens’ mother, Maggie Green, told CNN she had spoken to her son on Sunday and he told her that he was “mad with his girlfriend that’s why he is shooting people and he won’t stop until his mother or girlfriend tell him to stop.”
 
Green said she told him to stop. 
 
Stephens is employed at Beech Brook, an Ohio behavioral health agency.
 
“We are shocked and horrified like everyone else,” said Nancy Kortemeyer, a spokeswoman for Beech Brook. “To think that one of our employees could do this is awful.”