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Why Is One of Philly’s Greatest Teachers Being Ignored?
Jun 22, 2012 | News Archive
Why Is One of Philly’s Greatest Teachers Being Ignored?

Without Edward Robinson, you might think Hippocrates was the father of medicine. via Philly Post

"The birth of Edward Wesley Robinson Jr. on April 24, 1918 in Philadelphia laid the foundation for the birth of African consciousness—and the academic excellence of black students—in Philadelphia’s school district. Robinson, who died at age 94 on June 13th, was a historian, educator, professor, author, documentarian, filmmaker, and curriculum specialist who attended Central High School, Virginia State College for Negroes (now Virginia State University), Temple University School of Law, and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Robinson said that “Never during all my years in America’s best elementary schools, middle schools, junior high schools, high schools, colleges, and post-graduate schools was I ever taught anything about the huge body of information concerning the beauty, grandeur, and sophistication of Kemet (i.e., ancient Egypt) or the Songhai Empire. I was mis-educated. Fortunately, though, I was later rescued from cultural and intellectual oblivion by the intervention of my ancestors.” That rescue is quite obvious, and he wrote such books as Journey of the Songhai People and Twas the Night Before Kwanzaa.

Finding a “Lost” African History

Thanks to his prolific, synthesized research, many people of African descent in Philadelphia now know about Africa’s essential contributions to the world. Because of him, we now know that the Father of Medicine is Imhotep, an Egyptian, from circa 2650 BC and not Hippocrates, a Greek who wasn’t born until 2,200 years later.

We now know that calculus, algebra and geometry were invented in Egypt pre-1820 BC by Tishome, prior to 1650 BC by Ahmes, and circa 1500 BC by Tacokoma respectively. We now know that Herodotus, the Greek so-called Father of History, was wrong when he claimed that the Babylonians in 430 BC were the first to divide the day into 24 temporal hours. Instead, it was the Egyptians who did it about 3,000 years earlier with their sundial and later their shadow clock.

We now know that monotheism, despite being based on the Greek words “single” and “god” was actually created by Akenaten, an Egyptian from circa 1379 BC. And despite the western world’s use of BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini, meaning “In the year of the Lord”) as the yardstick by which years are measured, that yardstick wasn’t created until 46 BC by Julius Caesar and was later reformed by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 AD. But all of that is quite strange since the word “Christ” is actually from the Egyptian phrase “kher sesheta,” which means “he who watches over the mysteries” and which was used approximately 3,000 years before Julius and the Pope. In fact, it wasn’t until 300 AD that the man who had been known as Jesus was, for the first time, being referred to as “Christ.”





read more: http://blogs.phillymag.com/the_philly_post/2012/06/20/phillys-greatest-teachers-ignored/

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